Project Evo II Avanti Chrono Evo II - Our Fastest Bike. Ever.
Home
Aerodynamics

Benchmarking

A significant amount of time is spent analysing what makes a bike fast. Every area of the bikes on test is scrutinised and compared.

The genesis of any good design project is to take what exists already and improve on it. This is what benchmarking involves.

By taking current leading frame designs such as our very own Chrono and testing them in the purpose built wind tunnel in San Diego, California, with the same rider and componentry under exactly the same conditions, a database of information is created to analyse.

Benchmarking

Concept

Concept

Armed with a wealth of data the ADT (Avanti Design Technology) team analysed the results, learning where improvements could be made, to give direction to the project.

One area that stood out was the front brake and its impact on the overall aerodynamics of the bike. Development for an integrated front brake begins in line with the rest of the bike..

It is during the concept phase
that we start to
see what the final bike may look like. However, there is still a great deal
of work still to
be done.

Submodelling

Before a full bike can be built, each section of a bike is broken down into its individual components and assessed on a separate basis whilst still considering the overall design:

- Head Tube
- Fork
- Bottom bracket
- Seat stay attachment
- Seat tube / top tube attachment

Submodelling

Complete Bike Modelling

Complete Bike Modelling
Complete Bike Modelling
Complete Bike Modelling

Once the ADT team are happy with the individual elements of the bike it is time to put them all together and create a whole structure to analyse. This is still all in the pre-prototype phase of development.

The models being tested are hugely complicated and some take up to eight hours to solve.

Approximately 800 hours of aero engineering is spent developing the aerodynamics of the entire structure.

Models are built and then tested at angles from minus 20 degrees, through zero, and back to 20 degrees. These angles most represent the wind angle in the real world. An aerodynamic feature that works extremely well at 0 degrees may be appalling at 20 degrees.

All these factors
must be calculated and the very finest
of lines trodden to achieve the perfect balance of aerodynamics at the most wind angles.

Final Prototypes

It is during this stage that minor tweaks are made to the bike. No area is beyond scrutiny in the pursuit of perfection.

Once the team are happy with the modelling, prototypes are commissioned.

All the best modelling in the world can’t compete with the raw data and aesthetic appreciation that comes from a built prototype.

Final Prototypes

Wind Tunnel

Wind Tunnel

The most anticipated stage of development is the validation. This is where all the hours of design are put through its paces.

Off to the A2 wind tunnel in North Carolina, USA for the final testing phase.